Rainwater Harvest Systems

Harvesting rainwater and tapping into churches for distribution and education has multiple effects.

Rwanda is not the dry desert-like area you might picture when conjuring images of Africa. Based in the Sub-saharan area of the continent, Rwanda has 2 rainy seasons that provide 40 to 50 inches of rain a year—and it only takes 5 inches of rain to fill a 10,000-liter cistern (like the tank shown at right).

Rooftop rainwater harvesting connects a cistern to a building roof that include a gutter and pipe system to move the water to the storage tank. Once filled, cisterns stationed at churches are very convenient, since the main water source is nearby the homes, reducing the time spent traveling to collect water from other sources.

A rainwater harvesting system (installed by a volunteer Rwandan crew) costs roughly $3,200 for materials and installation. They usually fill up 1 to 1.5 times per month, providing 500 20-liter jerry cans of water—enough to serve about 100 families. Many of the churches either give the water away to the most vulnerable people in the community or sell the water for half the market rate. Any proceeds are given to the poorest members of the community for school fees, uniforms, and other unaffordable costs.

So far, we’ve installed 38 Rainwater Harvest Systems in 3 districts.  Want to help us put up more?  DONATE NOW

CAPTURING AND FILTERING RAIN, UNITING AREA CHURCHES, AND EMPOWERING RWANDAN VOLUNTEERS—IT’S A TRIPLE PLAY.